RETHINK
ECONOMICS
RETHINK
ECONOMICS
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Pluriverse: A Post-Development Dictionary

Ashish Kothari, Ariel Salleh, Arturo Escobar, Alberto Acosta, Federico Demaria
Tulika Books and Authorsupfront, 2019
Level: beginner
Perspective: -
Topic: (De-)growth, Globalization & International Economic Relations, Inequality & Class, Labour & Care, North-South-Relations & Development, Race & Gender, Resources, Environment & Climate, Social movements & Transformation
page count: 340 pages
ISBN: 9788193732984

Blurb

Pluriverse: A Post-Development Dictionary contains over one hundred essays on transformative initiatives and alternatives to the currently dominant processes of globalized development, including its structural roots in modernity, capitalism, state domination, and masculinist values. It offers critical essays on mainstream solutions that 'greenwash' development and presents radically different worldviews and practices from around the world that point to an ecologically wise and socially just world.

Book summary

The book is divided into three sections: First, it reassesses the 'development' concept and reflects on its relation to the multiple crises of modernity. The second part is a critical review of innovations or 'crisis solutions' with origin in the Global North. The third and largest part of the book comprises the 'Peoples Pluriverse' and presents a multitude of worldviews and practices emerging from indigenous, pastoral communities, urban neighbourhoods, environmental, feminist and spiritual movements. 

Comment from our editors:

In the form of short essays, the 'dictionary' presents well known ideas and practices such as 'Alternative Currencies', 'Buen Vivir' or 'Food Sovereignty' just as well as concepts like 'Agdals' or 'Negentropic Production' which you might not have heard before. All in all, the book is a great start to get an overview on the multitude of alternatives to the western development model which dominates the classical economic thinking.

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This project is brought to you by the Network for Pluralist Economics (Netzwerk Plurale Ökonomik e.V.).  It is committed to diversity and independence and is dependent on donations from people like you. Regular or one-off donations would be greatly appreciated.

 

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