173 results

2011
Level: débutant
In the second video of the series Investigating International Finance, an alternative view on capital controls is given contrasting with the paradigm of classical trade theory which suggests that the removal of trade and capital barriers is associated with higher market efficiency. After explaining the conceptual mechanisms underlying capital controls, examples are introduced where countries actually apply capital controls and how these controls have been associated with a lesser exposure to international financial crises spillovers.
2013
Level: débutant
How was money actually invented? Where does it come from? In this first episode of a video lecture, Dirk Bezemer from the University of Groningen presents the origins of money and how it's related to debt. It's a basic historical review and you can get an idea of how money is created and how banks work. The following episodes aim at giving an overview of the last debt crisis.
2012
Level: débutant
Banking 101 is a series of 6 short videos that ask the following questions: How do banks work and how is money created? Is reveals common misunderstandings of money creation and the role of banks. Furthermore, the videos show how models taught in many introductory classes to economics (Econ 101) do not reflect those processes: Part 1) “Misconceptions around Banking” questions common comprehensions of how banks work (savings = investments). Part 2) “What's wrong with the money multiplier” states that the model of the money multiplies is inaccurate. Part 3) “How is money really made by banks” explains the process of money creation, loans and inter-bank settlement. Part 4) “How much money banks create?” asks what limits the money creation by banks and presents the difference between reserve ratio, liquidity ration, equity and refers to the inter-bank market. Part 5) Explores the question if banks create money or just credit and especially refers to credit risks. Part 6) Explains how money gets destroyed when loans are paid back. Note: The videos refer to the UK monetary and banking system, some explanations don't apply to other banking systems, e.g. the reserve ratio.
2012
Level: débutant
Banking 101 is a series of 6 short videos that ask the following questions: How do banks work and how is money created? Is reveals common misunderstandings of money creation and the role of banks. Furthermore, the videos show how models taught in many introductory classes to economics (Econ 101) do not reflect those processes: Part 1) “Misconceptions around Banking” questions common comprehensions of how banks work (savings = investments). Part 2) “What's wrong with the money multiplier” states that the model of the money multiplies is inaccurate. Part 3) “How is money really made by banks” explains the process of money creation, loans and inter-bank settlement. Part 4) “How much money banks create?” asks what limits the money creation by banks and presents the difference between reserve ratio, liquidity ration, equity and refers to the inter-bank market. Part 5) Explores the question if banks create money or just credit and especially refers to credit risks. Part 6) Explains how money gets destroyed when loans are paid back. Note: The videos refer to the UK monetary and banking system, some explanations don't apply to other banking systems, e.g. the reserve ratio.
2012
Level: débutant
Banking 101 is a series of 6 short videos that ask the following questions: How do banks work and how is money created? Is reveals common misunderstandings of money creation and the role of banks. Furthermore, the videos show how models taught in many introductory classes to economics (Econ 101) do not reflect those processes: Part 1) “Misconceptions around Banking” questions common comprehensions of how banks work (savings = investments). Part 2) “What's wrong with the money multiplier” states that the model of the money multiplies is inaccurate. Part 3) “How is money really made by banks” explains the process of money creation, loans and inter-bank settlement. Part 4) “How much money banks create?” asks what limits the money creation by banks and presents the difference between reserve ratio, liquidity ration, equity and refers to the inter-bank market. Part 5) Explores the question if banks create money or just credit and especially refers to credit risks. Part 6) Explains how money gets destroyed when loans are paid back. Note: The videos refer to the UK monetary and banking system, some explanations don't apply to other banking systems, e.g. the reserve ratio.
2012
Level: débutant
Banking 101 is a series of 6 short videos that ask the following questions: How do banks work and how is money created? Is reveals common misunderstandings of money creation and the role of banks. Furthermore, the videos show how models taught in many introductory classes to economics (Econ 101) do not reflect those processes: Part 1) “Misconceptions around Banking” questions common comprehensions of how banks work (savings = investments). Part 2) “What's wrong with the money multiplier” states that the model of the money multiplies is inaccurate. Part 3) “How is money really made by banks” explains the process of money creation, loans and inter-bank settlement. Part 4) “How much money banks create?” asks what limits the money creation by banks and presents the difference between reserve ratio, liquidity ration, equity and refers to the inter-bank market. Part 5) Explores the question if banks create money or just credit and especially refers to credit risks. Part 6) Explains how money gets destroyed when loans are paid back. Note: The videos refer to the UK monetary and banking system, some explanations don't apply to other banking systems, e.g. the reserve ratio.
2012
Level: débutant
In the second video of the series Investigating International Finance, an alternative view on capital controls is given contrasting with the paradigm of classical trade theory suggesting that the removal of trade and capital barriers is associated with higher market efficiency. After explaining the conceptual mechanisms underlying capital controls, examples are introduced where countries actually apply capital controls and how these controls have been associated with a lesser exposure to international financial crises spillovers.
2015
Level: avancé
Sheila Dow discusses the concept of radical uncertainty and the failure of neoclassical economics to integrate it into its analysis. As to the implications for financial regulation that arise from the presence of radical uncertainty she argues for institutional overhaul, where the banks see themselves as a licensed partner of the central bank and where rules, values, and conventions would be subject to a cultural shift. Also, Sheila Dow advocates for a renewed focus on retail banking.
2012
Level: débutant
Banking 101 is a series of 6 short videos that ask the following questions: How do banks work and how is money created? Is reveals common misunderstandings of money creation and the role of banks. Furthermore, the videos show how models taught in many introductory classes to economics (Econ 101) do not reflect those processes: Part 1) “Misconceptions around Banking” questions common comprehensions of how banks work (savings = investments). Part 2) “What's wrong with the money multiplier” states that the model of the money multiplies is inaccurate. Part 3) “How is money really made by banks” explains the process of money creation, loans and inter-bank settlement. Part 4) “How much money banks create?” asks what limits the money creation by banks and presents the difference between reserve ratio, liquidity ration, equity and refers to the inter-bank market. Part 5) Explores the question if banks create money or just credit and especially refers to credit risks. Part 6) Explains how money gets destroyed when loans are paid back. Note: The videos refer to the UK monetary and banking system, some explanations don't apply to other banking systems, e.g. the reserve ratio.
2012
Level: débutant
Banking 101 is a series of 6 short videos that ask the following questions: How do banks work and how is money created? Is reveals common misunderstandings of money creation and the role of banks. Furthermore, the videos show how models taught in many introductory classes to economics (Econ 101) do not reflect those processes: Part 1) “Misconceptions around Banking” questions common comprehensions of how banks work (savings = investments). Part 2) “What's wrong with the money multiplier” states that the model of the money multiplies is inaccurate. Part 3) “How is money really made by banks” explains the process of money creation, loans and inter-bank settlement. Part 4) “How much money banks create?” asks what limits the money creation by banks and presents the difference between reserve ratio, liquidity ration, equity and refers to the inter-bank market. Part 5) Explores the question if banks create money or just credit and especially refers to credit risks. Part 6) Explains how money gets destroyed when loans are paid back. Note: The videos refer to the UK monetary and banking system, some explanations don't apply to other banking systems, e.g. the reserve ratio.
2015
Level: débutant
In this radio interview, Andrew Sayer first outlines some features of neoliberalism and policies that are associated with it. Then a difference between wealth creation via investment and wealth extraction by means of lending money to those deprived of it or by acquiring property such as real estate or financial assets on the secondary market as absentee owner is established. In this context reference is made to J.A. Hobson's concept of "improperty." Finally, there are some words on the power dynamics associated with capitalism and its relation to climate change.
2015
Level: débutant
Economist and politician Costas Lapavitsas: presents differing theoretical definitions of financialization, namely from Marxist and Post-Keynesian thinkers and compares their approaches. By presenting pattern and features of the economic and financial crisis, he interprets the latter as a crisis of financialization. Lapavitsas emphasizes his arguments by presenting data from the U.S. and Germany on the transformation of business, banks and households.
2016
Level: débutant
This multimedia dossier is part of the series „Understanding Finance“ by Finance Watch and explores the following questions: What is bank capital and how is it regulated? It further presents controversies on the size of bank capital in the aftermath of the financial crisis and on how bank capital affects economic activity.
2015
Level: débutant
This multimedia dossier is part of the series „Understanding Finance“ by Finance Watch and presents a description and critical review of financial markets and their functions. It furthermore discusses recent developments, as high frequency trading.
2014
Level: débutant
This multimedia dossier is part of the series „Understanding Finance“ by Finance Watch. The dossier focuses on universal banks – banks that pursue commercial and investment banking and points out several problems of those megabanks, especially in the context of the financial crisis (too big to fail).
2016
Level: débutant
What is money and how is it used? After answering these questions, Dirk Bezemer analyses how finance can be dysfunctional for the real economy.
2017
Level: débutant
How has financialisation changed saving What are its implications on a macro economic level and from a welfare state perspective Craig Berry I PEEL
2010
Level: débutant
In this video, the most famed biographer of John Maynard Keynes, Robert Skidelsky, explores the foundations of Keynesian economics
2017
Level: avancé
Anwar Shaikh explores alternative economic explanations, emphasizing 'real competition' theory and the role of imperfections in economic patterns.
2016
Level: avancé
In order to describe the global structure of the monetary and financial system and its effects on the global economy, most economics textbooks rely on unappropriated theories that provide nothing but outdated descriptions. In this talk, key speakers in economics, economic history and banking try to make this complex system a little more understandable by relying on real-world insights.
2018
Level: débutant
Have you ever wondered why it is so difficult to follow through on new year’s resolutions, such as to exercise more or to start saving more money towards retirement? The agent that most traditional economic models are based on would not struggle to keep up these resolutions. These agents are referred to as homo economicus.
2017
Level: débutant
Cette vidéo présente la notion de financiarisation de l'économie et ses effets, définie largement comme la prise d'importance croissante des activités financières dans l'économie. Elle évoque les contradictions du système financier : capable de financer l'économie mais aussi de capter la valeur produite à son profit.
2015
Level: débutant
Ce court article présente une approche de la monnaie comme élément actif - et non pas neutre - dans l'économie. Après avoir défendu l'idée que que la monnaie et le système monétaire sont à la fois cause du développement économique et de son effondrement, cet article présente un sept manières alternatives de concevoir cet objet.
2016
Level: débutant
L'article est une synthèse du livre "Conceptualizing Capitalism". Geoffrey Hodgson présente les points clés du livre. Il présente d'abord les différentes définitions du capitalisme et les concepts qui y sont associés : marché, propriété, salariat, finance. Ensuite, un focus est fait sur le rôle primordial de l'émergence des institutions financières et des confusions qui existent autour du terme de "capital". Un accent est porté sur l'importance d'une analyse historique et juridique du capitalisme. Hodgson introduit alors la notion d' "institutionnalisme juridique" pour "conceptualiser le capitalisme", afin de mieux le comprendre et éventuellement de prendre des mesures politiques à la hauteur des enjeux contemporains.
2018
Level: avancé
Cet entretien donne la parole à J.-F. Ponsot et V. Monvoisin, deux des coordinateurs de l'ouvrage "L'économie post-keynésienne. Histoire, théories et politiques" (Seuil, 2018), premier ouvrage de référence sur le post-keynésianisme paru en français. Les interviewés reviennent sur les fondements théoriques du courant du post-keynésianisme et ses apports principaux. Ils proposent ensuite une lecture sous l'angle post-keynésien de la politique monétaire non-conventionnelle de la Banque Centrale Européenne, du concept de revenu universel, de la monnaie européenne, et des politiques économiques françaises et européennes en général. Enfin, ils analysent la difficulté du pluralisme économique dans le champ de la recherche française et reviennent sur les récentes évolutions de l'économie standard, notamment le succès de l'économie expérimentale. Des liens vers des recensions de l'ouvrage sont disponibles sur le site de Médiapart : https://blogs.mediapart.fr/jean-marc-b/blog/010119/l-economie-post-keynesienne-histoire-theories-et-politiques ainsi que sur le site des Economistes Atterrés : http://www.atterres.org/livre/l%C3%A9conomie-post-keyn%C3%A9sienne .
2019
Level: débutant
Cet interview donne la parole à Jean-François Ponsot, l'un des coordinateurs de l'ouvrage "L'économie post-keynésienne. Histoire, théories et politiques" (Seuil, 2018), première synthèse en français sur le post-keynésianisme. Jean-François Ponsot revient d'abord sur les apports des post-keynésiens, notamment sur leur conception du chômage et de la relance économique. Il analyse ensuite la difficulté pour les théories hétérodoxes à s'installer dans le paysage théorique malgré la crise financière de 2007. Enfin, il explique en quoi les fondements du post-keynésianisme sont plus progressistes que populistes.
2019
Level: avancé
Cet interview donne la parole à Jean-François Ponsot, l'un des coordinateurs de l'ouvrage "L'économie post-keynésienne. Histoire, théories et politiques" (Seuil, 2018), première synthèse française du post-keynésianisme. J.-F. Ponsot revient sur le contenu du chapitre 21 dont il est l'auteur et qui traite du projet de système monétaire international soumis par Keynes après la Seconde Guerre Mondiale pour sortir du chaos provoqué par la crise et la guerre. Après un descriptif des principales caractéristiques de ce projet, qui n'a pas été retenu par la communauté internationale, J.-F. Ponsot présente les avantages qu'il aurait à être appliqué aujourd'hui, mais aussi les difficultés pratiques qui empêchent sa mise en oeuvre dans le contexte monétaire et financier actuel.
2019
Level: avancé
Approaching the law of nature that determines all forms of economy. The bulk of economic theory addresses the economic process by setting out on a catalogue of aspects, seeking the laws in the aspects and hoping to get together a reliable view of the whole.
2016
Level: avancé
In this article, Perry Mehrling, a professor of economics at Barnard College, presents and discusses three theories of banking which are guiding bank regulation. These are credit creation theory, fractional reserve theory and debt intermediation theory.
2016
Level: avancé
En trente ans, la finance est devenue toute-puissante. Pas un jour sans connaître les mouvements du FTSE ou du NASDAQ, pas une semaine sans analyse du change, pas un mois sans fermeture d’usine, pas un an sans inquiétude sur la dette publique, pas une décennie sans une crise financière. Le bilan macroéconomique de nos économies occidentales est peu glorieux : une croissance molle, des investissements atones, un chômage endémique, des inégalités croissantes. Le constat est sans appel : les politiques libérales ont déréglementé la finance, et la banque, qui accompagnait autrefois l’industrie dans ses investissements à long terme, lui fait aujourd’hui obstacle. La créativité des financiers s’est substituée à celle des entrepreneurs. Il est urgent de remettre la finance à sa place : ce n’est pas à l’économie d’obéir à la finance, mais à la finance de servir l’économie. Un ouvrage qui décrypte trente ans de financiarisation de l’économie, propose un examen détaillé de l’articulation entreprise/ finance et avance des propositions – analysées et commentées par Michel Aglietta – pour mieux penser l’économie réelle.
2018
Level: débutant
À l'occasion de la parution de la première grande synthèse en français sur l'école post-keynésienne, entretien de Mediapart avec Virginie Monvoisin, professeure à la Grenoble École de Management, qui a coordonné l'ouvrage, et Dany Lang, maître de conférence à Paris 13 qui y a participé.
2019
Level: débutant
Dans cet épisode, nous nous posons la question du rôle de la monnaie dans une économie capitaliste. Pour cela, nous comparons le fonctionnement de deux économies en apparence identique, à ceci près que la première fonctionne sans monnaie, comme une économie de troc, et la seconde est monétaire. Nous nous apercevons alors que le caractère monétaire ou non d’une économie modifie radicalement ses propriétés. La détermination des profits sera ainsi très différente dans ces deux économies, les relations de causalité entre dépôts et crédits, épargne et investissement s’inversent, une crise de surproduction est possible dans un cas mais pas dans l’autre, et le chômage peut également avoir des origines très différentes, et même opposées, selon que l’on considère une économie monétaire ou non. Les propriétés de l’économie de troc recouvrent celles de la théorie économique standard (théorie néoclassique) qui s’est historiquement construite sans prendre en considération la monnaie, celle-ci étant considérée comme neutre sur l’économie. Les propriétés de l’économie monétaire rappellent quant à elles celles des modèles postkeynésiens, bien moins connus, et qui trouvent leurs origines dans les travaux et écrits de Keynes, qui affirmait dans son ouvrage le plus célèbre (la théorie générale de l’emploi de l’intérêt et de la monnaie) que « lorsqu’on s’attaque à la recherche des facteurs qui déterminent les volumes globaux de la production et de l’emploi, la Théorie complète d’une Economie Monétaire devient indispensable » (1936, p. 297). Pour approfondir le fonctionnement d’une économie monétaire, vous pouvez lire le livre de Laurent Cordonnier, maître de conférences à l’Université de Lille, « L’économie des Toambapiks » qui présente à partir d’une « fable » la loi des profits de Kalecki dont nous parlons dans la vidéo. Le livre se lit très facilement.

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Ce projet est le fruit du travail des membres du réseau international pour le pluralisme en économie, dans la sphère germanophone (Netzwerk Plurale Ökonomik e.V.) et dans la sphère francophone (Rethinking Economics Switzerland / Rethinking Economics Belgium / PEPS-Économie France). Nous sommes fortement attachés à notre indépendance et à notre diversité et vos dons permettent de le rester ! 

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